Women Artists Trained In Advocacy

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The Women’s Arts Institute Africa has completed a four day advocacy training in Accra for its members. The training a prerequisite for a business advocacy project funded by BUSAC built the capacity of participants to engage state institutions on issues confronting their businesses.?

From right to left, Hon Dzifa Gomashie, Deputy Minister of Tourism, Culture and Creative Arts, Akofa Edjeani, film producer, Madam Akwele Suma Glory, President of wAiA, Harriet Darko, photographer and web designer, and Sarah Dah photographer.
From right to left, Hon Dzifa Gomashie, Deputy Minister of Tourism, Culture and Creative Arts, Akofa Edjeani, film producer, Madam Akwele Suma Glory, President of wAiA, Harriet Darko, photographer and web designer, and Sarah Dah photographer.

The Women’s Arts Institute Africa a network of creative professionals and organizations? is committed to mobilizing women in the arts to experiment and explore creative expressions leading to the development of African societies and? economic gains for women artists.

 

Speaking at the opening ceremony of the four day training workshop, the President of wAiA, Madam Akwele Suma Glory, a multi media artist, said the Women Arts Institute Africa (wAiA) started working in October 2006 in Accra. The focus of the Institute is to lead the world wide call on the linkages between the arts and development in Ghana and, to bridge the rhetoric gap on the arts and their essence to citizens welfare.

Madam Glory noted that the Arts is life and the convergence of different arts is a journey to refueling the energies of Ghana to give life to its being. Without the arts there will be no movement. The world will be still and nothing.

The Guest of Honour for the Opening Ceremony, Hon Dzifa Gomashie, Deputy Minister of Tourism, Culture and Creative Arts, said what defines a nation is its arts, culture, customs and traditions. Culture is the very foundation of the Ghanaian society.

In addition, the Honourable Minister noted that customs and traditions tell us where we came from, the arts show us where we stand and point to where we might be going. The arts provide a mirror to our collective and individual beings. Without acknowledging culture and its due importance, Ghana stand unable to face the rest of the world, unable to deal with our ourselves.

The advocacy training is part of a 10 month long project designed to seek the implementation of the Ghana Cultural True Fund. The 38 participants drawn from Winneba, Kasoa, Pokuase, Tema, Kumasi, Bolga and Tamale included professionals from the visual arts, performing arts and the film industry.

Like many of the project wAiA has undertaken to support women in the arts, this initiative will help artists? in Ghana to access a fund where they can tap resources to produce work for sale leading to better businesses.

 

 

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